Tokyo, Japan 8th to 12th August 2012

This blog written by Ann, over to you Ann.

Greetings from Tokyo. Flight was good – 11 hours flew by (see what I did there…) although JAL's seats were not quite up to BA's flat bed standards. The food and the service, on the other hand, were superb. We seem to have handled the 16 hour time change rather well, so far. There are many excellent limousine bus services from Haneda aiport to the main hotels, at about 7000 yen single per person. They're very efficient and happy to deal with heavy bags. We actually got in just a little late for the last bus to our hotel so they advised us to go to the Hyatt and take a taxi to the Intercontinental, it all worked well. Japanese staff seem very service oriented, wouldn't accept a tip if offered (would be offended in fact) and are extremely willing to meet your needs. The best thing to do is immediately goto the customer information booth when you land, they're very very helpful.

How to describe Tokyo? Clean to the point of clinical. Affluent. Industrious. Expensive. Refined. Classy. Confident. Safe. Painfully polite. Geeky/ nerdy. Kinky. Cookie-cutter 'salarymen', girls as individual as the fashions they wear. Crazy high heeled shoe-wearing taken to whole new level (in all this humid heat and concrete – respect!) Brilliantly funny 'cartoonized' public messages. Clam-shells, not smart phones (!) Superb quality food (even sandwiches are world class). Do I like this city though? Not much.

First thing to report on, is the toilet situation. There are 2 kinds in Tokyo. First kind, you sit down on a heated seat and there are buttons to: a) jet-wash your 'posterior', b) activate the bidet function (sprays your front bits) c) blow dry the above mentioned, with jets of warm air. Second kind of toilet: squat pan in the floor. Now, I'm starting to rather like the first kind, in a slightly embarrassed kind of a way but, having narrowly missed selection for the Olympic gymnastics team, I'm struggling somewhat with the latter. Solution: double-dose Immodium for the next 4 days!

We visited the Imperial Palace Gardens, hot, empty and utterly uninteresting. Ginza, expensive and soul-less window on top end brand shopping. We went to Akihabara Electric Town, which is a declining PC and electrical goods area which has turned to 'otaku' fans of anime/manga and which is full of manga/anime shops, games arcades, 'maid cafes' and was frankly all quite weird even if you like anime or manga. We then went to the Edo-Tokyo museum which had some excellent models and some great exhibits but also strange omissions in the history, especially over the Imperial Japanese War in the Pacific, China etc.

Off to see what the crazy Tokyo teenagers get up to on a Saturday night in downtown Shibuya. The crossing there is the one you always see in films and news broadcasts and it boasts the busiest Starbucks in the world. Cup of coffee before we go then…

Shibuya was excellent and just the Japan we were looking for, neon, people, activity, mix of old and new. Right on the mark.


Just been in a Pachinko parlour. This is a kind of vertical pinball slot machine into which you pour a basketfull of small balls and then manipulate them, through the pins, into certain locations. Directly gambling

on pachinko is illegal in Japan, so balls won cannot be exchanged directly for money in the parlour, but are exchanged for tokens or prizes, which are then taken outside and exchanged for cash at a nominally separate place.
The Japanese government estimates the annual revenues of the pachinko industry to be in the region of ¥29 trillion (US$378 billion) – approximately four times the total annual profit of WORLD-WIDE legal casino gambling!!!!!!!
Quite apart from the damage to the pocket, the NOISE level in these places (which are on every street corner) is deafening.

So, Tokyo, very expensive, only way to live is to eat the excellent white rice balls or white sandwiches with the crusts cut off from the 7-11 or Lawsons convenience store. It's not a very tourist friendly city, not least because it's so expensive (and I checked Japanese salaries and it's expensive for them, our salaries in real terms are very similar) but also it's not at all geared up for foreigners. Ironic eh? One of the world's key suppliers of tourists, from a place that's not at all interesting!

Ah well, it's ticked off the bucket list.

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